How To Teach Your Child About Mind-Body Connection

If you want to live a healthy, happy life, you need to understand the mind-body connection. You may find it hard, however, to undo years of programming telling you that your moods or feelings are unrelated to conditions in your body. Kids have a much easier time understanding, so you should teach yours as soon as possible. From children’s meditation to stretching exercises, there are plenty of fun ways to start today.

What Is Mind-Body Connection & Why Should Your Child Understand It?

The term “mind-body connection” refers to the simple concept that the feelings your brain produces are a reflection of your body’s needs. The mind and body are closely linked to one another because they are part of the same whole. If one isn’t getting what it needs, the other suffers.


Though children often struggle to separate their feelings and their physical states, they can start learning critical coping mechanisms surprisingly early. Children as young as four can start to recognize the difference between tension and calm, though many struggle to eat anything healthy besides gummy vitamins for kids.

This might seem to go against nature, but it’s just a sign that growing children need calories. As they mature, they can begin to associate differences in how they feel after exercising or eating well, forming good habits that last a lifetime.

Activities That Involve Mind-Body Connection

The activities you can do with your kids depend on their ages. For preschool-aged young ones, use bedtime to focus the breath. Tell them to inhale for a count of four and exhale for the same. Have them imagine a ball of light moving through their body, moving from the legs to the arms to the head.

Early school-aged children can do basic yoga poses, though you shouldn’t expect to have them sitting through hour-long sessions. Child’s Pose, Warrior poses, and Cat-Cow stretches are all perfect for getting rid of unneeded tension. You can even teach your kids to breathe like you would in an adult class.

Though yoga is often associated with stretching, the two aren’t the same. Stretching is just one component of yoga, and it can be much easier to get kids to stretch without doing breathing exercises or tough poses. Teach them simple leg stretches, especially at the end of the day when they’re likely to be wound up.

Some exercises only work when children are going through rough emotions. If you notice the signs of a panic attack or hear them spiraling, have them control their breath. Tell them to breathe in for four counts and out for seven. This naturally calms the nervous system and teaches them that getting worked up can cause stress.

The mind-body connection isn’t just about exercise or breathing, it’s about taking care of the whole body. Your kids are perfect candidates for healthy living, so give them what they need.

Use Wellements organic probiotic drops for digestion or a daily multivitamin for overall health. When they get older, they’ll be glad you taught them the skills for mind-body health.

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5 Comments

  1. I love yoga and I want my children to do it, too. Especially my youngest one who doesn’t really have too many physical activities since the pandemic struck. Unlike his brothers, he stopped doing ballet.

  2. thank you for sharing about this sometimes ang hirap i explain sa kids na why they have to take this and that. kahit na it would be good for their health

  3. Oh this is informative! I’ll share this to my sister para habang bata palang anak nya she knows this mind and body connection for my pamankin. <3

  4. This is good for the kids! Teaching them how to achieve healthy lifestyle at the early age.

  5. I don’t have a kid yet, but I do have nieces and nephews. As a former pediatric nurse, I advise and suggest activities for the kids. I believe that introducing yoga is good. Children are naturally curious, and they will ask, therefore parents must be extremely patient when doing this. Thank you for the recommendations!

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